Kombucha- a great daily addition

Kombucha

Kombucha culture brewing

 

I’m a great fan of personal health self empowerment. Anything you can do at home that will add to your healing program is all to the good. Probiotics, beneficial bacteria of many types, including acidophilus from yogurt, have been helping their human hosts for centuries. A zippy drink, long popular in Europe and Asia, is getting some serious attention here these days. It’s become so popular, in fact, that it made the pages of the New York Times today. While you’re there, check out the picture of a home kombucha brewing setup.

Kombucha is the contemporary name for sweetened tea that has been fermented using a macroscopic solid mass of microorganisms (kombucha colony). Though often called a mushroom, it actually consists principally of beneficial bacteria and yeast cultures. The Kombucha culture feeds on some type of sugar that’s been added to the brew, and, in exchange, produces other valuable substances.

Floating on the surface of your home brewing vessel, the culture looks somewhat like a large pancake.

I’ll blog soon about the benefits of kombucha for your daily life.

Any kombucha drinkers out there? Send me your stories and we can discuss them.

 


6 Comments

  • Jackie booth says:

    Hi,

    I am mainly Vata with a bit of Pitta. Should I drink Kombucha? As I have been making it at home. However i am not meant to be having yeast for Vata I was recommended.

    Greatful for your help

    Jackie

  • Yogi says:

    Thank you for your question, Jackie! We spoke with our herbalist, Karta Purkh Singh Khalsa, and he noted that in general, people of vata constitution do better without a lot of yeasted food, such as live Kombucha drinks.

    Our teas, Yogi Green Tea Kombucha and Green Tea Kombucha Decaf, do not contain a significant amount of yeast. For the Kombucha used in our tea, we start with an actual live kombucha culture to create a green tea kombucha infusion. This infusion is grown in a base of water and green tea leaves. The water from this mixture is then removed by a natural spray dry process. Given that this process pasteurizes the infusion’s microbial culture, our Green Tea Kombucha does not contain living organisms as does traditional kombucha. However, the beneficial by-products of the kombucha culture remain, including numerous acids and vitamins.

    Further, although we do not add yeast to any of our teas, it is naturally occurring in the raw materials used in our teas. Please be assured that here at Yogi, we test all incoming raw materials for the presence of yeast. We follow strict specifications based on food safety and FDA regulations, and if any materials do not meet these specifications, they are not used in production.

    For natural and organic flavors, herbal extracts and essential oils, combined yeast and mold must be <1,000 cfu/gram (colony forming units). For herbs, botanicals and spices, combined yeast and mold must be <100,000 cfu/gram. This is fairly typical for natural and organic herbs and spices that have not been irradiated, steamed or chemically treated.

    Lastly, any amount of yeast would be inactivated once boiling water has been added.

    We hope this is helpful, and please let us know if you have any further questions.

    Thank you again & Be well!

  • Todd says:

    Hello,

    I recently discovered this tea. I drink many different yogi teas. I did not know that Kombucha can contain trace amounts of alcohol? As a recovering alcoholic, I’m concerned. I have read that the alcohol would dissipate during the infusion process, but can you provide me with a bit more info? I can’t imagine you’d put a product out with traceable amounts of alcohol.

    Thank you,

    TG

  • Yogi says:

    Thank you for your question, Todd! We are happy to provide you with information regarding alcohol and our teas.

    For the kombucha used in our tea, we start with an actual live kombucha culture to create a green tea kombucha infusion. This infusion is grown in a base of water and green tea leaves. The water from this mixture is then removed by a natural spray dry process. In the process of drying the kombucha back onto the green tea leaves, the alcohol from the kombucha infusion completely dissipates. However, we do not test for residual alcohol in our teas. We currently use kombucha in four of our teas: Green Tea Kombucha, Green Tea Kombucha Decaf, Green Tea Energy and Green Tea Triple Echinacea.

    In addition, some of our teas contain alcohol-based natural flavors and/or herbal extracts that are extracted directly from the herb or botanical in a water/alcohol solution. Although the alcohol evaporates from these ingredients, as mentioned we do not test for residual alcohol. If a Yogi tea contains a natural flavor and/or herbal extract, it would be listed in the Supplement Facts panel on the tea’s outer carton.

    We hope this is helpful information, and welcome you to email customerservice@yogiproducts.com if you have any further questions. Thank you again & Be well!

  • Bonnie Alvarez says:

    Is your Yogi brand Kombucha tea fermented before packaging? I am interested in the health benefits of probiotics.

  • Yogi says:

    Hi there, Bonnie! Thanks so much for your question.

    For the kombucha used in our tea, we start with an actual live kombucha culture to create a green tea kombucha infusion. This infusion is grown in a base of water and green tea leaves. The water from this mixture is then removed by a natural spray dry process. Given that this process pasteurizes the infusion’s microbial culture, our Green Tea Kombucha Decaf does not contain living organisms as does traditional kombucha. However, some of the beneficial by-products of the kombucha culture remain, including numerous acids and vitamins.

    We hope this helps to answer your question! Please feel free to let us know if we can be of any further assistance.

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The Tea Talk Blog is written by Karta Purkh Singh Khalsa, Yogi herbalist with over 40 years experience.
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